6 Things to Consider with Upholstery

You've decided to reupholster

Six Things to Consider

Practical Functionality

What type of home is it and who will use it? If there are children and pets, you might want to rethink the silks, wools and linens. The same goes for rooms that get a lot of use (living room, kitchen) compared to those that do not where you can use more luxurious textiles (bedrooms) – you need a material that will protect against those scuffs and scratches.

Materials & maintenance

It’s important to consider how some materials age over time. Some might add character, while others start to look worn and in need of reupholstery before you expected. How often do you want to have to look after your furniture? How long do you expect it to last for? Ask us how much work your favourite material needs before committing.

Sunlight

Something people often don’t take into account is the fading of materials that occurs from natural sun-light. If your furniture will be in a well-lit room, let us know so we can choose the appropriate materials.

Furniture Shape

If you’re going for a big piece with lots of curves it might be best to go for a block-colour fabric, as intricate patterns up close don’t always translate well to larger items. Plus, people seem to get tired quicker of intricate patterns and outlandish colours on bigger items, generally preferring more classical neutrals. Save your accent colours for smaller ornaments or pieces of furniture so that they will really pop out against the neutral backdrop.

Hidden costs

Unlike with bespoke furniture where you can generally plan a budget really, with upholstery you may find from time to time that once a piece has been stripped back there is extra damage that needs treating before rebuilding. Are there woodworms? Do the joints need reworking? Should we revarnish before rebuilding?

budgeting

We really feel it’s important to share your budget with us from the get go. This way we can help you plan by suggesting different materials for your piece, without compromising on quality. The labour is the most important thing as compromising on labour time and correct techniques is ultimately compromising on quality and longevity of the piece.

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Upholstery needle on leather